Technical Books on Forensic Science and Forensic Medicine: Anil Aggrawal's Internet Journal of Forensic Medicine, Vol.3, No. 2, July - December 2002
  home  > Volume 3, Number 2, July - December 2002  > Reviews  > Technical Books  > page 8a: quiz on Toxicology of Herbal Products   (you are here)
Navigation ribbon

Anil Aggrawal's Internet Journal of Forensic Medicine and ToxicologyProfessor Anil AggrawalAnil Aggrawal's Internet Journal of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology

Anil Aggrawal's Internet Journal of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology

Volume 3, Number 2, July - December 2002

Book Reviews: Technical Books Section

(Page 8a)

(N.B. Please increase your screen resolution to 1600 x 1200 dpi or more, for best viewing)
OTHER REVIEWS IN THIS ISSUE
[Technical Books Section] Pages: |1| 2| 3| 4| 5| 6| 7| 8| 9| 10| 11| 12| 13| 14| 15| 16| 17| 18| 19| 20|

[Popular Books Section] Pages: |1| 2| 3| 4| 5| 6|

[Books on CD/Audio Tapes] Pages: |1|

[Software/Multimedia] Pages: |1|

[Online Courses] Pages: |1|

REVIEWS IN THE PREVIOUS ISSUE  | NEXT ISSUE


QUIZ ON THE TOXICOLOGY AND CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY OF HERBAL PRODUCTS



 Toxicology and Clinical Pharmacology of Herbal Products, 1stEdition, Edited by Melanie Johns Cupp, PharmD, BCPS .   Hard Bound, 6" x 9".
(A Book from Forensic Science and Medicine Series by Humana Press)
Humana Press Inc., 999 Riverview Drive, Suite 208, Totowa, New Jersey 07512; Publication Date 15 February, 2000. xxvi + 325 pages, ISBN 0-89603-791-6 (alk. Paper). Price $79.50

Toxicology and Clinical Pharmacology of Herbal Products
Click cover to buy from Amazon
In Association with Amazon.com

You just read the review of this book. Are you still undecided about this book? Well, you might want to take this quiz to evaluate yourself on the Toxicology and Clinical Pharmacology of Herbal Products.
Here goes!
 

1. Its botanical name is Uncaria tomentosa. It is considered so good for health, that it is often referred to as the life-giving vine of Peru? Can you identify this plant?

Garlic
Ginger
Chaparral
Cat's claw
(for detailed information, see Page 295 of this book) 


2. Among other uses, this herb has been used as an antidote for LSD flashbacks. Can you name this herb?

St. John's wort
Valerian
Chaparral
Ma Huang
(for detailed information, see Page 177 of this book) 


3. It is a small tree native to eastern North America and eastern Asia. Among the many fantastic claims about its magical properties was that it could promote pregnancy because it aided menstrual flow. In the 1787 edition of Materia Medica Americana, its root was listed a remedy for cancerous ulcers. In 1833, The American Practice of Medicine listed its oil as a cure for osteosarcomatous tumors. It is now known that not only does it have no antineoplastic activity, it is carcinogenic itself. In fact FDA prohibits most of its products as food additives and flavorings because of their carcinogenic properties. Can you name this tree?

Borage
Sassafras
Calamus
Comfrey
(for detailed information, see Pages 245-246 of this book) 


4. It is a perennial plant with a yellow flower that reaches heights of 30 cm. The leaves are hoof-shaped and toothed, and they are green on top with white hairs on the underside. Senkirkine, one of the pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PA) present in this plant has been shown to be hepatotoxic in rats. Which herb are we talking about?

Coltsfoot
Borage
Cranberry
Ginseng
(for detailed information, see Page 191 of this book) 


5. It is a small perennial shrub with thin stems. It rarely grows to more than a foot in height, and at first glance, the plant looks very much like a small broom. It contains a novel antibiotic called transtorine, which might explain why in the 1600s, Indians and Spaniards in the American Southwest used it as a treatment for venereal disease. Which shrub are we talking about?

St. John's Wort
ephedra
Feverfew
Chamomile
(for detailed information, see Pages 11-12 of this book) 


6. The name of this plant means "proper order". It has been known historically as a female remedy and has been referred to variously as "empress of the herbs", "sovereign herb for women" and "the female ginseng". Historic uses include treatment of dysmenorrhea, amenorrhea, metrorrhagia and menopausal syndromes (all female disorders related to menstruation). Which plant are we talking about?

Dong Quai
Saw Palmetto
Panax Ginseng
Cascara Sagrada
(for detailed information, see Page 289 of this book) 


7. Its name is derived from a Hebrew word meaning "a shining, bitter substance". It is also called "burn plant", because of its reputed use in wounds and burns. People who use it chronically suffer from a harmless discoloration of the colon called "Melanosis coli". Which plant are we talking about?

Valerian
Kava
Echinacea
Aloe
(for detailed information, see Pages 259-262 of this book) 


8. It was introduced into American medicine in 1773 by Dr. Lawrence Van Derveer who used it to treat rabies; hence its common name "mad-dog weed". It was believed that it relieved muscle spasm associated with rabies, but was not found to cure it. Can you name this perennial?

Comfrey
Cascara Sagrada
Scullcap
Borage
(for detailed information, see Page 215 of this book) 


9. The flowers and leaves of this herb have long been used to treat all kinds of respiratory disorders, but its use to prevent coughs and soothe the throat is well documented. Can you tell the name of this herb?

Comfrey
Coltsfoot
Scullcap
Licorice
(for detailed information, see Page 191 of this book) 


10. This plant contains an active principle which is a potent central nervous system (CNS) stimulant. Injections of this active principle, called philopon (which means "love of work") were given to Japanese kamikaze pilots during World War II. Can you name the plant?

Senna
Cascara Sagrada
Dong Quai
ephedra
(for detailed information, see Page 12 of this book) 


11. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) is the active constituent of which of the following herbs?

Ginger
Garlic
Calamus
Chaparral
(for detailed information, see Page 177 of this book) 


12. Tussilagone is the active constituent of which of the following herbs?

Cat's claw
Coltsfoot
Cascara Sagrada
Calamus
(for detailed information, see Page 193 of this book) 


13. In the Philippines, a mixture called shabu was once traditionally smoked for its stimulating effect. It was a mixture of caffeine and a chemical which comes from one of the following plants. Can you identify it?

Cranberry
Saw Palmetto
Panax Ginseng
ephedra
(for detailed information, see Page 12 of this book) 


14. L-652,469 is a compound that has been shown to weakly inhibit receptors for platelet-activating factor (PAF) and to weakly block Ca2+ channels, thus inhibiting platelet aggregation and inflammation. Which herb does it come from?

Aloe
Pokeweed
Licorice
Coltsfoot
(for detailed information, see Page 193 of this book) 


15. Some European reports suggest that this plant could be useful in the treatment of AIDS when used in combination with zidovudine (AZT). These reports have in fact fueled its demand in the United States. Can you identify this interesting plant?

Comfrey
Cat's claw
scullcap
Coltsfoot
(for detailed information, see Pages 295-6 of this book) 


16. This herb acts as a demulcent, which is one of its main pharmacologic effects. Mucilage is the sole ingredient responsible for this action. Which herb are we talking about?

Cat's claw
Dong Quai
Coltsfoot
Cascara Sagrada
(for detailed information, see Page 192 of this book) 


17. A member of the rose family, it is a spiny, small tree or bush with white flowers and red berries, each containing one to three nuts. Known also as "ladies' meat" and "bread and cheese tree", its extract purportedly dilates coronary blood vessels. Its active principles are thought to be flavonoids, including hyperoside, vitexin, vitexin-rhamnose, rutin and oligomeric procyanidins. Which plant are we talking about?

Hawthorn
Scullcap
Ma Huang
Comfrey
(for detailed information, see Pages 253-254 of this book) 


18. The hepatotoxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) present in this herb pose the greatest concern regarding its use. Which herb are we talking about?

Cat's Claw
Coltsfoot
Aloe
Hawthorn
(for detailed information, see Page 193 of this book) 


19. Characteristic of pyrrolizidine alkaloid (PA) intoxication is

hepatic venoocclusive disease
spontaneous brain hemorrhages
macular degeneration
gastric and duodenal ulcers
(for detailed information, see Page 193 of this book) 


20. It grows in several parts of the world, including the eastern United States, Canada, California, and Hawaii along roadsides and fences. Its stems resemble those of horseradish, resulting in accidental poisoning. Its berries yield a juice which has been used by Europeans as a dye for wine. So characteristic is its colored juice that it has been called the "red ink plant". In fact one of the major clues that a person has accidentally poisoned himself with it, is the purple stains from its juice on the hands and face of the victim. Three lectins (PL-A, PL-B and PL-C) have been purified from its root, and all three exhibit mitogenic actions. Mobitz type I heart block has been reported after ingestion of its uncooked leaves. Can you name this large perennial herb?

Valerian
Chamomile
Senna
Pokeweed
(for detailed information, see Pages 237-239 of this book) 


Your Score Was: 

Correct answers:


Your rating:

100%     - Perfect! You probably don't need this book.
90-95% - Your knowledge on the Toxicology and Clinical Pharmacology of Herbal Products is admirable. You probably might do without it.
70-85% - Your knowledge on this subject is sound, but this book could be useful to you to fill up your knowledge gaps.
50-65% - Average! This book could be very useful to you.
20-45% - You are an enthusiastic learner of this subject. This book could be extremely useful to you.
0-15% - The very fact that you took this quiz indicates you have an interest in this subject. But probably did not come across a good book. This book is for you.


Back to the review

 Order Humana Press Books by clicking here.
or via telephone: (973) 256-1699 or Fax: (973) 256-8341 or Email:humana@humanapr.com

 Request a PDF file of this quiz by clicking here. (If your screen resolution can not be increased, or if printing this page is giving you problems like overlapping of graphics and/or tables etc, you can take a proper printout from a pdf file. You will need an Acrobat Reader though.)


 N.B. It is essential to read this journal - and especially this quiz as it contains several tables and high resolution graphics - under a screen resolution of 1600 x 1200 dpi or more. If the resolution is less than this, you may see broken or overlapping tables/graphics, graphics overlying text or other anomalies. It is strongly advised to switch over to this resolution to read this journal - and especially this review. These pages are viewed best in Netscape Navigator 4.7 and above.

-Anil Aggrawal






Books for review must be submitted at the following address.

Professor Anil Aggrawal (Editor-in-Chief)
Anil Aggrawal's Internet Journal of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology
S-299 Greater Kailash-1
New Delhi-110048
India

 Click here to contact us.

 This page has been constructed and maintained by Dr. Anil Aggrawal, Professor of Forensic Medicine, at the Maulana Azad Medical College, New Delhi-110002. You may want to give me the feedback to make this pages better. Please be kind enough to write your comments in the guestbook maintained above. These comments would help me make these pages better.

IMPORTANT NOTE: ALL PAPERS APPEARING IN THIS ONLINE JOURNAL ARE COPYRIGHTED BY "ANIL AGGRAWAL'S INTERNET JOURNAL OF FORENSIC MEDICINE AND TOXICOLOGY" AND MAY NOT BE REPOSTED, REPRINTED OR OTHERWISE USED IN ANY MANNER WITHOUT THE WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE WEBMASTER

Questions or suggestions ? Please use  ICQ 19727771 or email to dr_anil@hotmail.com

Page Professor Anil Aggrawal via ICQ

  home  > Volume 3, Number 2, July - December 2002  > Reviews  > Technical Books  > page 8a: quiz on Toxicology of Herbal Products   (you are here)
Navigation ribbon