Paper 4: Autopsy Of Forensic Medicine - Looking Beyond the Four Corners of our Department by Manoj Dashrathlal Gupta: Anil Aggrawal's Internet Journal of Forensic Medicine: Vol. 10, No. 1 (January - June 2009)
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Received: February 28, 2008
Accepted: December 2, 2008
Ref: Gupta MD.  Autopsy Of Forensic Medicne - Looking Beyond the Four Corners of our Depatment.  Anil Aggrawal's Internet Journal of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology [serial online], 2009; Vol. 10, No. 1 (January - June 2009): [about 3 p]. Available from: . Published : January 1, 2009, (Accessed: 

Email the corresponding author Dr. Manoj Gupta by clicking here

Manoj Dashrathlal Gupta, Associate Professor, Department of forensic medicine, Bharti Vidyapeeth Medical College, Pune
M.D. Gupta

Autopsy Of Forensic Medicine - Looking Beyond the Four Corners of our Department

by Manoj Dashrathlal Gupta
Associate Professor,
Department of forensic medicine,
Bharti Vidyapeeth Medical College,
Pune
E-mail: drmdg1973@gmail.com


Abstract

The paper critically looks at the state of forensic medicine in India, and makes an appeal to all concerned to make some concerted efforts to raise its levels.

Keywords

Forensic Medicine

Introduction

Does forensic medicine need reformation? All of us will have to confess that lot of thing have yet to be done in the field. Forensic medicine is lying almost dead at the moment in India.

As a Forensic Pathologist we always look upon an ideology in our field to get inspiration. We see progress of forensic science but we have not done anything special in forensic medicine especially in developing private practice.

I am sounding bit cynical. But this should end somewhere. Who can do it? Or who will do it? That is the question.
...Where do we stand vis--vis our clinical colleagues is the question I would like to ask our forensic medicine friends in India. We teach undergraduate students about rape, alcohol intoxication, injury certificate, age estimation and many other related clinical forensic medicine topics, but have we ever thought that clinical forensic medicine has remained only part of undergraduate text books...

Everyone knows clinical fields have reached a stage where research can bring out many new medicines and new techniques of treating patients. Evidence based medicine or nanotechnology and many more technologies have already been added in clinical sciences. Clinical fields are getting fine tuned and have always found their way. Now we have so many specialties of a particular field. An ophthalmologist is an anterior chamber surgeon, a posterior chamber surgeon etc. etc. Who ever thought 15 years ago that there will be a separate multispecialty ophthalmology hospital?

Where do we stand vis--vis our clinical colleagues is the question I would like to ask our forensic medicine friends in India. We teach undergraduate students about rape, alcohol intoxication, injury certificate, age estimation and many other related clinical forensic medicine topics, but have we ever thought that clinical forensic medicine has remained only part of undergraduate text books. How many of us have actually taken keen interest in doing practical clinical forensic medicine cases? Are we feeling scared about our credentials in private practice? Do we have the feeling what people will think when we start private practice?. Dear friends, it has to start from somewhere. Some forensic medicine experts have taken bold steps by starting this concept in India.

Clinical forensic medicine is the most underrated field that has to be developed in India. Private hospitals/clinicians in India are skeptical in admitting cases of attempted homicide or rape or any case in which medicolegal question would arise. Most of the clinicians are busy in their private practice and tend to avoid attending those cases where he may have to depose before court for evidence. Have we ever thought of guiding these clinicians who avoid cases just for the sake of medicolegal problem?. If we take medicolegal responsibilities of hospitals we can help and guide them.

Many experts from this field are coming out with fresh ideas such as to start a website to promote forensic medicine at large. Credit should be given to all those who actually thought of reforming our field. Now the onus is on younger generation forensic medicine expert to further reform by doing something in private practice and to take forward the good work.

Some areas which need attention in private practice as a forensic pathologist.
...Credit should be given to all those who actually thought of reforming our field. Now the onus is on younger generation forensic medicine expert to further reform by doing something in private practice and to take forward the good work...

1. Clinical forensic medicine.

2. Forensic Toxicology

3. Medicolegal investigations in fraud life insurance claims.

4. Guiding lawyers for preparing defense in civil/criminal matters etc

I hope my fellow colleagues will think about this, and let me know their own views.


*Corresponding author and requests for clarifications and further details:
Manoj Gupta,
Associate Professor,
Department of forensic medicine,
Bharti Vidyapeeth Medical College,
Pune, India
E-mail: drmdg1973@gmail.com
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